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Women's Health

Mercy Women's Care at St. Anne
3404 W. Sylvania Avenue
Toledo, OH 43623
419-407-1616

Mercy Women's Care at St. Charles
Navarre Medical Plaza
2702 Navarre Avenue
Suite 101
Oregon, OH 43616
696-7900

Mercy Women's Care at St. V's
2213 Cherry Street
Toledo, OH 43608
419-251-4340

Knee Replacement Surgery

separator The knee is the most common joint for replacement surgery. In these operations, the surgeon replaces the damaged surfaces of the thigh bone, shin bone and kneecap with an implant made of metals, plastics and polymers. Most of the time, other structures of the knee, such as connecting ligaments, remain in place.

The knee is one of the most complex joints in the body, and there are more than 150 knee replacement designs for your doctor to choose from. As with hip replacement, the type of implant your doctor chooses depends on your age, weight, and health status.

Successful knee replacement procedures enable people to become active once again, to live without debilitating pain, to sleep better and in general to experience a better quality of life. They have a high success rate, especially for people who follow their rehabilitation regimen to the letter.

Hospital stays for knee replacement typically last several days. But more and more hospitals are offering minimally invasive knee replacement surgery, which involves smaller incisions, less blood loss and faster recovery times.

Preparing your home before the surgery

  • These are the kinds of things you’ll need to have in place when you get home from the hospital, for knee and for hip replacement surgery:
    · In each room you’ll be spending time in, make sure the things you use regularly are within easy reach. The idea is to avoid bending over or reaching up high.
  • Rearrange furniture so that you can walk a straight path from room to room.
  • Make sure you have a couple of hard, straight chairs. They’re easier to get into and out of than chairs with soft cushions. The seat itself should be fairly high as well.
  • Keep any throw rugs out of the way during your recovery time.

If you live alone, ask your doctor or physical therapist how much help you’ll need when you get home. They may suggest that you have someone stay with you at first, or that someone check on you periodically, so be sure to plan for that.

Source:
American Academy of Orthopedic Surgery.



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